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Warehouse District Park

A coffee bistro would be fine although I would be a bit concerned about the park being used for utilities, trash service, deliveries and whatnot.
 
yes but as a parent with young children I can tell you that my biggest dream is to have a coffeeshop / winebar with a patio overlooking a playground so I can enjoy a drink while keeping an eye on my children. It would the first of its kind in the city and would be major attraction for parents, guaranteed. If I'm sitting in BPs I might as well be no where near the park.
Allowing the sale of alcohol in any business in the park adjacent to the children's area is something I would be opposing.
^Exactly. Walking into BP's to get a personal to go and a pop is not quite the experience I am looking for at this new urban oasis. We want something more urban, more 'big city' and something to ensure folks want to come, socialize, people watch and relax.
I think there is ample opportunity for businesses to open up across the alleys - and no need for a liquor licensed restaurant to operate next to a children's playground in what is a small park. If you could inform me about a park in a BIG city that allows alcohol sales from a kiosk/counter adjacent to a children's playground - this grandfather would like to know.
 
Allowing the sale of alcohol in any business in the park adjacent to the children's area is something I would be opposing.

I think there is ample opportunity for businesses to open up across the alleys - and no need for a liquor licensed restaurant to operate next to a children's playground in what is a small park. If you could inform me about a park in a BIG city that allows alcohol sales from a kiosk/counter adjacent to a children's playground - this grandfather would like to know.
Not related to selling alcohol directly by a playground, but in many parts of Europe you can walk in city parks, where children are sometimes present along with playgrounds, and openly consume alcohol. Having a licensed establishment within the park will not cause mayhem.
 
Not related to selling alcohol directly by a playground, but in many parts of Europe you can walk in city parks, where children are sometimes present along with playgrounds, and openly consume alcohol. Having a licensed establishment within the park will not cause mayhem.
In Spain and particularly Madrid it is illegal to byob and drink in any public park. In Madrid's most used and grandest park El Retiro, there are licensed restaurants in beautiful surroundings but without a playground immediately adjacent. In France only an alcoholic (which is frowned on severely) would drink in a small neighbourhood park hosting a play ground. But drinking with a picnic lunch in large "parks" like Champ de Mars is acceptable. Warehouse Park is a small park by any European standard and meant to be a "community" park by its size and proposed design - at least that is my understanding. I do not see why taxpayers should build a restaurant/bar when for example Boston Pizza (as an example) might be enticed to knock out the back wall of the bar and add outdoor tables. That may be possible along all of the alley's and possibly with food trucks.
 
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Allowing the sale of alcohol in any business in the park adjacent to the children's area is something I would be opposing.

I think there is ample opportunity for businesses to open up across the alleys - and no need for a liquor licensed restaurant to operate next to a children's playground in what is a small park. If you could inform me about a park in a BIG city that allows alcohol sales from a kiosk/counter adjacent to a children's playground - this grandfather would like to know.
2 football fields worth of park isn’t something I’d call small.
 
Currently liquor sales and cannabis retail sales must be 100m from any park with a playground. However it's often hard to justify those separation distances at SDAB, there's little evidence that it has any effect on neighbouring properties. There's no separation distances when it comes to bars and neighbourhood pubs, or restaurant uses.

Montreal allows alcohol consumption in parks as long as you are eating food . Usually people just go to the convenience store and grab a bag of chips.
 
I mean, what exactly are we worried about...kids seeing an adult drinking something that looks like any other drink to them? If we're worried about intoxication, there's ways to control that without outlawing casual drinks for all at any time of the day. If someone wants to get loaded they typically don't pick a cafe next to a playground. Time to use some common sense and end these prohibition era laws.
 
No alcohol next to playgrounds...ugh.... the puritan streak in North America continues. What's wrong with parents enjoying a pint while their kids play on swing/slide? That's literally happening everywhere on the planet except N.A.
I don't know about playgrounds but on Halloween when parents are drinking out of their travel mugs while escorting their trick or treating kids, 75% of the time it's like an adult drink.
 
What We Heard Report from the May consultations.


- Ustructured design
- Slops and hills
- Washroom facility on west side of park/plaza
- Fountain
- Entry plaza off 106 Street
- Dedicated play area
- Picnic areas
I would think that safety and vibrancy come from more intense uses. More intense uses would be active uses that are not as easily deterred by the atmosphere of a place - I.e., organized sports. We do not need another dog park/playground that is eventually abandoned by the majority because the atmosphere is hampered by safety concerns around the area. Passive uses alone are not reliable in creating vibrancy downtown, and we have multiple parks in and around downtown to show that. This park needs to include intense use space to compliment the passive uses.

I really hope administration is able to see the need for active uses despite the results of this public feedback.
 

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