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Miscellaneous

Saw this sign posted at the Eric Cormack site that went to public tendering in the fall. The closing date for bids was mid January, but in mid February I received an email update saying the opportunity had been cancelled. It would be disappointing if the Alberta Government decided not to sell it.


82CEECB7-95D2-46F7-9C27-AD98AF523361.jpeg


(“Barricades are been setup” come on at least read it over once lol)
 
Well, if what we've been told on here is true (issues with the city, waiting for an election to be completed) makes sense it's a slow year.

2024 could be a good one though!
Usually every two years should be spicy eg 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2021,
But 2023 is gotta be the pattern breaker
Here's hoping that 2024 or 2025 are strong years
Or maybe.. Just maybe we will have a mega strong fall
and all the announcements will happen this summer
 
^ Also just lots of big projects on the go at the moment. Over 2500+ units being built just within a KM of the University (plus still more planned in Windsor Park and Belgravia — see @Marcolangzi’s posts) and then there’s the 121st node being built up with Hat 122, Mercury block(s), The Jameson, and then obviously Station Lands, The Parks and Falcon towers downtown.

I would hazard a guess that some are waiting to see the impacts of these projects before proceeding as well
 
Permit Type
Major Development Permit
Permit Date
Jul 02, 2021
Status
Approved
Description of Development
To construct a 48 Dwelling Multi-unit Housing building, and to demolish the existing Multi-unit Housing building.
Address
13803 - 109 AVENUE NW

BP is in:

2023-05-10
Commercial Final
To construct a 48 Dwelling Multi-unit Housing building (4- Storey Apartment Building) - Glenora, building A.
13803 - 109 AVENUE NW

Glenora-Building-A-13803-109-Ave-NW-Edmonton-AB..png
 
The person with the seeing eye dog made me think about the angled pillars we see on the new canopy.

How do architects prevent, say, a blind person (or an inattentive person for that matter) from bonking their heads on an angled pillar?
 
The person with the seeing eye dog made me think about the angled pillars we see on the new canopy.

How do architects prevent, say, a blind person (or an inattentive person for that matter) from bonking their heads on an angled pillar?
Usually by having those tactile lines on the sidewalk, to guide them away from it.
 
How do architects prevent, say, a blind person (or an inattentive person for that matter) from bonking their heads on an angled pillar?
The Building code mandates physical barriers around such angled elements (angled elements such as stairs as a common example)... could be a planter or a pony wall or a display case.
 

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