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Downtown

I went out for a walk DT and got a couple of photos. Then my battery ran down.
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And here's a night view of the valley from the 19th floor of the Chateau Lacombe
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I noted on another thread about the garbage around our central library and I feel things have regressed again in the last couple of months in dt overall after improvement during the summer. I don't have pics, but riding my bike along the multi use trail along the lrt tracks between 95 st and Commonwealth Stadium was draw dropping for both my buddy and I. So much garbage, trees and garbage that had been set on fire, and abandoned personal belongings scattered all over. It was unbelievable.

Rode on the multi use trail again yesterday along the lrt tracks between 96 st and Stadium Station and all the encampments and the belongings along with garbage and debris and broken glass were all removed. Other than some dead trees from fires, it was completely bare and clean.
 
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Parlour Barba now open inside Henry Singer in Stantec tower! Shaves, tailor cuts, great drink selection and amazing barbers!


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TRENDWATCH: Jobs, Retail, & Real Estate in 2024
Real Talk Ryan Jespersen

What does the future look like for workers, job seekers, employers, entrepreneurs, and property owners? Is it really a doomsday scenario for downtowns? When will we see restored confidence in new business ventures? Will employers ever expect a full "return to work" scenario? We explore the most relevant and interesting trends in this episode of Real Talk.

1:45 | Heather Thomson, Puneeta McBryan, and Cory Wosnack look back at 2023, then ahead to 2024, through their expert lenses (and crystal balls).

 
I stopped in the new Henry Singer store in Stantec and was disappointed to see that the only entrance into the store is from the lobby, which was not even that direct, almost like it was intended as a loading corridor primarlily. They do have doors to the street within the store, so hopefully they can make those accessible from the outside at some point, as it's not very convenient to get into the store right now.

I am looking forward to when Bar Henry opens up - I believe that may have it's own entrance from the street.
 
TRENDWATCH: Jobs, Retail, & Real Estate in 2024
Real Talk Ryan Jespersen

What does the future look like for workers, job seekers, employers, entrepreneurs, and property owners? Is it really a doomsday scenario for downtowns? When will we see restored confidence in new business ventures? Will employers ever expect a full "return to work" scenario? We explore the most relevant and interesting trends in this episode of Real Talk.

1:45 | Heather Thomson, Puneeta McBryan, and Cory Wosnack look back at 2023, then ahead to 2024, through their expert lenses (and crystal balls).


They talked about some very successful downtown restaurants, bars and even retail outlets but I don't think any were mentioned by name. And others, not named, were said to be hanging on by a thread.

What are the most successful of Edmonton's downtown establishments?
 
They talked about some very successful downtown restaurants, bars and even retail outlets but I don't think any were mentioned by name. And others, not named, were said to be hanging on by a thread.

What are the most successful of Edmonton's downtown establishments?
I didn't love the line where Puneeta insinuated the planning happening for downtown is solely focused on those 18-35. I understand the context with growing student populations and maybe it's just my old self/way of thinking talking but youth while important for vibrancy aren't going to bring with them the disposable income needed for businesses to thrive.

Otherwise enjoyed the convo but felt like it was a bit of "everything is thriving" mixed with "things are really tough out there" which maybe signifies the true disparity depending on if businesses are in the "nice pockets" of downtown and certain business models.
 
I didn't love the line where Puneeta insinuated the planning happening for downtown is solely focused on those 18-35. I understand the context with growing student populations and maybe it's just my old self/way of thinking talking but youth while important for vibrancy aren't going to bring with them the disposable income needed for businesses to thrive.

Otherwise enjoyed the convo but felt like it was a bit of "everything is thriving" mixed with "things are really tough out there" which maybe signifies the true disparity depending on if businesses are in the "nice pockets" of downtown and certain business models.

Honestly, despite arguably as easy of access to the UofA as Strathcona and Garneau plus having MacEwan right there, Downtown doesn't really feel like it caters strongly to under 25s. The establishments are either mixed (which include under 25s) or more focused on 25-40 year olds. Which is honestly fine... Whyte Ave is extremely 18-25 focused, so it's nice to have areas that are more for people who still want to go out and may not have families yet but are still more grown up than undergrads. Not to mention the fact that, despite covid and WFH, a lot of restaurants and bars still orient around office workers. The vibe of Downtown (and Oliver's) demographic focus feels more like young adults early in their careers than those in lecture halls.
 
I didn't love the line where Puneeta insinuated the planning happening for downtown is solely focused on those 18-35. I understand the context with growing student populations and maybe it's just my old self/way of thinking talking but youth while important for vibrancy aren't going to bring with them the disposable income needed for businesses to thrive.

Otherwise enjoyed the convo but felt like it was a bit of "everything is thriving" mixed with "things are really tough out there" which maybe signifies the true disparity depending on if businesses are in the "nice pockets" of downtown and certain business models.
But those of us over 35+ know what downtown is all about for the most part. It's the younger demographic who they should start focusing on as that's where you can potentially change the perception some people have about it.
 
There is actually a variety of people our downtown needs to consider and serve better. For instance, there are a considerable number of empty nesters and retired people who live downtown or nearby, with some disposable income. With the lack of enough nearby retail goods and services, however they pretty much can and have to drive elsewhere a lot even if they would prefer to walk to nearby stores. They are largely the forgotten and neglected residents already there.

If students are just coming for the day to go to school, it doesn't help the area so much, particularly if they go back to the suburbs at the end of the day. But if more live in the area it can help a lot. So maybe we should be thinking more about student housing more in the downtown core and not just on the edge of Oliver near MacEwan.

However, downtown is probably not going to attract a youthful crowd as much as Whyte Ave with its abundant nightlife and proximity to the U of A, which is larger than the downtown educational institutions..
 

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