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Cycling and Active Transportation in Edmonton

TAS, that is a European city and no where in Edmonton is there a place that has even comes close to having that much bicycle traffic.

To get that kind of bicycle traffic we would need European gas prices and this city was built on gas.
 
TAS, that is a European city and no where in Edmonton is there a place that has even comes close to having that much bicycle traffic.

To get that kind of bicycle traffic we would need European gas prices and this city was built on gas.

A girl can dream can't she?

I thought it was interesting enough to post on this forum page nonetheless.

Happy World Bicycle Day!
 
TAS, that is a European city and no where in Edmonton is there a place that has even comes close to having that much bicycle traffic.

To get that kind of bicycle traffic we would need European gas prices and this city was built on gas.
We definitely won't get there but # of cyclists seems to be increasing every year based on my anecdotal experience in DT. I think that more bike lanes/MUP will increase that number.
 
Bike Edmonton

Help make 102 Ave people-first​

Write to your councillor by Monday, June 6​

1654351318973.png


 
I'm sorry but this picture doesn't encourage me to want to see this road closed completely. If all they can think of is some chairs and tables than I think they are missing the boat. Also what about the big patio in front of the library, why can't these chairs and tables go there. Personally the one thing I see as a positive of keeping the road open is there is a quieter place to drop off and pick up pedestrians going to the library main door and Churchill square without bus traffic right behind you.
 
Winnipeg's Bike Valet program at CFL football games is impressive. Let's get this idea going here.


Screenshot_20220605-051557_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
This link is broken for me now, it says access is restricted. I made a dataset that should be easy to keep tabs on. On the right hand side, you can filter for certain counter locations, dates, and whether the counters were for cyclists, pedestrians, or both.

Bike counters only:
Bike Count 2022 1.PNG

Bike, pedestrian, and hybrid counters for the same time frame. Looking at the data for May 2022 (the 2m+ month), apparently Keillor was the most popular destination for pedestrians by far.
Bike count 2022.PNG
 
This link is broken for me now, it says access is restricted. I made a dataset that should be easy to keep tabs on. On the right hand side, you can filter for certain counter locations, dates, and whether the counters were for cyclists, pedestrians, or both.

Bike counters only:

Bike, pedestrian, and hybrid counters for the same time frame. Looking at the data for May 2022 (the 2m+ month), apparently Keillor was the most popular destination for pedestrians by far.
Awesome stuff! Curious – do you think the change in bike counters is due to a change in where people are biking? This data does not reflect the anecdotes we have from bike stores about surging sales.
 
Awesome stuff! Curious – do you think the change in bike counters is due to a change in where people are biking? This data does not reflect the anecdotes we have from bike stores about surging sales.
I know a handful of people that have moved from daily commuters to twice a week commuters to downtown (where most counters are). So I bet that’s a big impact. A bunch of people cycling 50% of what they did in 2019 will make counts a lot lower.

I think it’ll be interesting to explore how we track cycling as we move away from just the downtown grid and embrace more hybrid work/15min communities. Also the city data on transportation is a more black/white “do you drive or are you a cyclist” type questions. Where a more accurate way to understand transportation, especially in Edmonton, will be understanding what % of trips in a week are different modes. I suspect the future more many could look like 50% car, 25% bike, 20% transit, 5% car share type stuff. But right now, someone like this shows up as a driver in city data.
 
Let's get as many federal dollars as we can and get our bike infrastructure built - sign up using the link below. I'm signed up.
Coun. Janz is leading the charge.

 
Defining what Edmonton will look like in the future:
  • Active Transportation Network - The City is exploring improvements that can be made to the active transportation infrastructure to complete missing links in the routes, paths and lanes in the following five corridors:
  • Fort Road - 127 Avenue to 153 Avenue
  • 127 Street - Yellowhead Trail to 137 Avenue
  • 106 Street - Princess Elizabeth Avenue to 118 Avenue
  • 102 Avenue - 136 Street to 139 Street
  • 100 Avenue - 102 Street to 103 Street
..........Engagement will primarily consist of stakeholder meetings with property and..........business owners along these corridors, with an online survey from June 13 - 27. For..........details visit edmonton.ca/ActiveTransportation.
  • City Council Public Hearing on June 22. Edmontonians are invited to speak to Council on bylaws and related reports. Register to speak online or in person.

Details about City public digital engagement activities are listed online atengaged.edmonton.ca with all opportunities at edmonton.ca/publicinvolvementcalendar.
 
The survey for the corridors is now open, and closes on June 23. You can see the presentation here, it's worth the read since they list the reasons for why each proposal was chosen. But here are screenshots of the proposals for the five different corridors. The general project page is here.

"Intent is to complete the gap from the 66 Street shared pathway on the southeast side of the corridor to the 153 Avenue shared pathway running east-west. Option A - Shared pathway on the east side of Fort Road (closer to transit centres/LRT station) Option B - Shared pathway on the west side of Fort Road (closer to residential neighbourhoods)
Fort Road 1.PNG


"Existing shared pathways are located along: West side of 127 Street from Yellowhead Trail to 127 Avenue , West side of 127 Street north of 137 Avenue. Intent is to complete the gap between these two pathways. In some areas, the existing boulevard will allow for the sidewalk to be widened to a shared pathway. In other areas, the vehicle lanes will be narrowed and the west curb will be shifted east to allow for a wider boulevard for the new shared pathway. Only one feasible option identified due to existing active transportation network and technical constraints."
127 Ave.PNG


"Existing shared pathways are located along the: East side of 106 Street from 111 Avenue to Princess Elizabeth Avenue East side of 106 Street north of 118 Avenue. Intent is to complete the gap between these two pathways. Corridor travels through the NAIT campus. Existing sidewalk will be widened to a shared pathway. Two possible ways to accommodate the pathway: Existing centre median may be removed and the east curb extended to create a wider boulevard, or space from existing boulevard may be reallocated to widen existing sidewalk."
106 St.PNG


"Existing shared pathway located along north side east of 136 Street. West of 139 Street, active transportation improvements are anticipated as part of Valley Line West construction. Intent is to complete the gap between these two areas. Existing shared pathway at 136 Street will be extended west to 139 Street. It will connect with improvements related to the future Valley Line LRT. Only one feasible option was identified for this corridor due to existing active transportation network."
102 Ave 1.PNG


"Existing two-way protected bike lane runs along: North side of 100 Avenue west of 103 Street, West side of 103 Street north of 100 Avenue. A protected two-way bike lane along the north side of 100 Avenue, as an extension of the existing lane west of 103 Street."
100 Ave.PNG
 

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