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Federal Politics

Can one safely assume that 99% of this cash goes towards the salaries of whomever is managing each group?
 

Kerri Diotte wearing a shirt with his name on it. Guess he's planning another run as MP.

When it comes to carbon tax and the argument about how much the average person pays (for goods/services) vs. how much is received in rebate, there is certainly not much focus and attention about the purpose of the a price on pollution in the first place - to curb behaviours that contribute to pollution and incentivize behaviors that reduce it.
 

Kerri Diotte wearing a shirt with his name on it. Guess he's planning another run as MP.

When it comes to carbon tax and the argument about how much the average person pays (for goods/services) vs. how much is received in rebate, there is certainly not much focus and attention about the purpose of the a price on pollution in the first place - to curb behaviours that contribute to pollution and incentivize behaviors that reduce it.

Kerry Diotte is a Faith Goldy fan. Nuff said.
 
I will never understand why they went with a carbon tax. They're so politically charged and as we have seen get a lot of people very angry. I get that a revenue neutral carbon tax is a lot cheaper and easier to implement than other policies, however I think you could find that money elsewhere.

I would personally prefer a combination of:

1: A cap and trade system, selling permits to companies to extract a certain amount oil, with a limited number of permits that reduces year after year.
2: Weening the oil industry off their subsidies, which would gradually increase prices and make it a less and less attractive option for consumers, and redirecting those funds to renewables and building a battery system.

You could create revenue through the sale of the permits and reduce spending through the reduction of subsidies, all while putting Canada on a path to an easier transition away from this horrific industry. I think this would be politically easier to do, because people see TAX and immediately think of the government taking their money. Whereas these policies would be a little bit more subtle and behind the scenes in the way they would manage the transition.

The Liberals won't do this because they went all in on the carbon tax. The Conservatives won't do it because big oil is in their pockets. I doubt the NDP would do this either, they would probably stay the course of whatever the Liberals were doing, should they gain power (extremely unlikely).

When it comes to renewables, obviously, wind and solar are big, but Canada has the potential to become a nuclear powerhouse. We have massive uranium deposits, particularly in Northern Saskatchewan. It also avoids a lot of issues O&G proponents bring up when it comes to renewables, ie: a supposed lack of reliability (a robust network of batteries would help here as well).
 
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When it comes to transitioning from coal to methane (natural) gas, and the billions of tax dollars spent to do that, we sure haven't ended up that much further ahead in terms of less heat causing pollution and air quality, according to the findings in this video.

It's comparable to "replacing a heroin addiction with an opioid crisis."

To allow the oil and gas industry measuring/reporting their own gas leakage rates is laughable (and not surprisingly, unreliable).

And how is it the term 'clean natural gas' has become a believable thing? It's 70-90% methane!

 
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I will never understand why they went with a carbon tax. They're so politically charged and as we have seen get a lot of people very angry. I get that a revenue neutral carbon tax is a lot cheaper and easier to implement than other policies, however I think you could find that money elsewhere.

I would personally prefer a combination of:

1: A cap and trade system, selling permits to companies to extract a certain amount oil, with a limited number of permits that reduces year after year.
2: Weening the oil industry off their subsidies, which would gradually increase prices and make it a less and less attractive option for consumers, and redirecting those funds to renewables and building a battery system.

You could create revenue through the sale of the permits and reduce spending through the reduction of subsidies, all while putting Canada on a path to an easier transition away from this horrific industry. I think this would be politically easier to do, because people see TAX and immediately think of the government taking their money. Whereas these policies would be a little bit more subtle and behind the scenes in the way they would manage the transition.

The Liberals won't do this because they went all in on the carbon tax. The Conservatives won't do it because big oil is in their pockets. I doubt the NDP would do this either, they would probably stay the course of whatever the Liberals were doing, should they gain power (extremely unlikely).

When it comes to renewables, obviously, wind and solar are big, but Canada has the potential to become a nuclear powerhouse. We have massive uranium deposits, particularly in Northern Saskatchewan. It also avoids a lot of issues O&G proponents bring up when it comes to renewables, ie: a supposed lack of reliability (a robust network of batteries would help here as well).
Carbon tax is the federal backstop if the provinces are unwilling to implement any other system. It is also been proven to be one of the more efficient ways of reducing carbon emissions. If provinces (like Quebec) want to get out of it, they're more than able to implement their own system. Ignorance isn't a path forward anymore
 

I’m sure this has come up in other threads but there is a new law coming that prevents further collaboration between the federal government and the cities without the provincial government’s consent. I find it very troubling that the city is losing one of its last bits of independence, especially when our needs aren’t being met provincially.

 

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