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Edmonton - Red Deer - Calgary Hyperloop | ?m | ?s | Transpod

What do you think of a Hyperloop between Edmonton and Calgary?


  • Total voters
    72
Hell, if there were a just reasonably fast train that would get me from core to core in approximately three hours and it had decent service frequency, I would take that option literally 100% of the time
Apparently people didn't when that service existed in prior years (Dayliner history).
and there are no turns (because according to the Virgin Hyperloop folks that would've meant reducing speeds to 360km/h for comfort and safety)
Depends on the radius of the turns (comparable to banking and turning in an aircraft). The flat Prairie gives lots of options for large turning radiuses.
a thing where you safely transition the environment between 0 atmospheres and 1 atmosphere
The atmospheric pressure inside the pod would not change from the outdoor pressure at any station -- the air density on the leading edge of the pod (outside the pod and inside the enclosing tube) would be reduced relative to the pressure behind the pods forward direction to reduce friction and add to forward momentum -- that is where the partial vacuum comes in.

For any route involving a stop in Red Deer or any of the airports, the travel time advantages/disadvantages are even worse.
I would imagine that the Red Deer route would be optional and not factor into Edmonton-to-Calgary express routes. On the other hand, imagine living in Red Deer and working in Edmonton where the major commute is only 20 minutes -- I could see that being a workable option for many folks (small City life; big City employment).
 
Also please remember the Dayliner existed at a time when the corridor was not as populous, people were more car crazy, and had little appetite for anything other than suburban living. Also the Dayliner service itself left a lot to be desired, mainly in frequency and reliability. Saying it didn’t work then, doesn’t mean it wouldn’t work now
 
Apparently people didn't when that service existed in prior years (Dayliner history).
Actually, I do. While I understand that at one point it could do the run in 3.5 hours back in 1955, that CP proceeded to vigorously neglect the service and constantly lobby for its discontinuation because they did not want to support passenger rail at all on the corridor, even if VIA was running it. I also understand that the Budd RDC equipment was rather noisy and less than comfortable even back in its day and would be a far cry from something like a modern regional train like the Stadler Flirt. Also, the Dayliner was frequently involved in collisions because the track just wasn't that great. Also, the service was anything but frequent.

There's certainly plenty of room to do better the Dayliner could manage without going with all up HSR, and maybe just a bit more of a market nowadays.
Depends on the radius of the turns (comparable to banking and turning in an aircraft). The flat Prairie gives lots of options for large turning radiuses.
The actual terrain is a bit more complex than our stereotypes would suggest, even before we get to all of the built stuff along the direct path between the two.
The atmospheric pressure inside the pod would not change from the outdoor pressure at any station -- the air density on the leading edge of the pod (outside the pod and inside the enclosing tube) would be reduced relative to the pressure behind the pods forward direction to reduce friction and add to forward momentum -- that is where the partial vacuum comes in.
I've attached a rendering from Transpod's website of how they envision one of their stations. I'm not talking about the pod pressure changing: that would be bad. I'm talking about how they picture getting people into and out of the pods.


I would imagine that the Red Deer route would be optional and not factor into Edmonton-to-Calgary express routes. On the other hand, imagine living in Red Deer and working in Edmonton where the major commute is only 20 minutes -- I could see that being a workable option for many folks (small City life; big City employment).
It will be interesting to engineer a system where the pod is switched from the main line to the station siding without letting all of the air into the tube.

transpod-station-01.jpg
 
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Was the Dayliner really an Edmonton-Calgary express rail service? I assume it would have stopped at every light bulb along the way.
It could at one point actually manage the run in 3.5 hours back when it was introduced, with its top operating speed being noted as 85mph. It was never frequent, though, nor was it a particularly great ride. Technically, even though it ran on rails, the Budd RDC equipment they used didn't really fulfil the minimum definition of a train. Stopped in Didsbury, Olds, Innisfail, Red Deer and Wetaskiwin.
 
nor was it a particularly great ride
You rode the Dayliner? I did, several times... it was actually fun in my opinion. And I like the concept that it fed into communities along the way -- I took it on occasions to visit relatives in Ponoka (from Edmonton); I took it once to Red Deer to meet up with friends doing a short stacay at Sylvan Lake where they had a lakeside cabin; and I also took it to Calgary once during Stampede Week (other than the chuck-wagon races, I didn't see a reason for going back for that event -- I more enjoyed the atmosphere and the closeness of the Edmonton Finals Rodeo at the onetime Edmonton Gardens). It was only inconsistent in that it had to accommodate freight priorities (other rail traffic). At the time the main reason for cancelling was that Dayliner was unable to compete on the full Edmonton-to-Calgary route with the airlines (the planes could match the fare and get you there in greatly expedited time (the so-called Air Bus) -- these were the days before rigorous safety check-ins and where one didn't have to plan or pre-purchase an airfare for that particular route). I don't believe HSR is a viable alternative, economically speaking, to other forms of transportation that would take one from Edmonton City Centre to Calgary City Centre -- way too expensive for the population that it would serve; I could see a new milk-run reprised in support of smaller communities on the Ed-Cal corridor (but that's not HSR), especially as these communities grow and catalyzing an important factor in their growth. I could also see Hyperloop working (I don't believe the engineering is all that daunting) because it would be a new and different experience with lots of side potentials (holographic experiences; super high speed -- being able to live in one City and work in the other -- expedited commutes; a world-first in its functional build out (yay Edmonton; yay Alberta); a good energy deployment (remember the propulsion system is well-tested Maglev, only assisted by a partial vacuum in the leading edge of movement) that is electricity based and partially recovered in the braking operation; expense-shared with freight runs (operationally); and a good test run for other possibilities -- freight dispersion from the port of Prince Rupert to Edmonton which could then be an exceptional transportation hub for western (and eastern, eventually) freight movement throughout North America, based at EIA. I have not yet heard a good positive argument for HSR, nor have I heard a reasoned argument to halt the Hyperloop experiment.
 
I could also see Hyperloop working (I don't believe the engineering is all that daunting) because it would be a new and different experience with lots of side potentials (holographic experiences; super high speed -- being able to live in one City and work in the other -- expedited commutes; a world-first in its functional build out (yay Edmonton; yay Alberta); a good energy deployment (remember the propulsion system is well-tested Maglev, only assisted by a partial vacuum in the leading edge of movement) that is electricity based and partially recovered in the braking operation; expense-shared with freight runs (operationally); and a good test run for other possibilities -- freight dispersion from the port of Prince Rupert to Edmonton which could then be an exceptional transportation hub for western (and eastern, eventually) freight movement throughout North America, based at EIA. I have not yet heard a good positive argument for HSR, nor have I heard a reasoned argument to halt the Hyperloop experiment.

I apologize for taking you seriously, but concede that if "hyperloop" were anything but vapourware it would move fewer people than HSR in about the same amount of time from gate to gate while still costing at least twice as much as maglev, using the most optimistic details available.
 
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