News   Apr 03, 2020
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Cycling and Active Transportation in Edmonton

Some building owners along the 105 Ave bike lane are doing a nice job cleaning up property and making it vibrant - like the Shumka Dance Studio.

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If any one of you have such a trailer, bring it there to see if there is room before complaining. You must note that the sidewalk is level to the road so there is enough space on the sidewalk side.
 
If any one of you have such a trailer, bring it there to see if there is room before complaining. You must note that the sidewalk is level to the road so there is enough space on the sidewalk side.
That is still ridiculously narrow even without a trailer or cargo bike.
 

*groan*

Why do news outlets constantly run these types of stories against anything that remotely challenges the supremacy of the automobile?
 

*groan*

Why do news outlets constantly run these types of stories against anything that remotely challenges the supremacy of the automobile?
Such annoying articles. Why do we feature random citizens whining about things they know nothing about? How is that news...
 
As someone who often drives and sometime bikes on 132 Ave, 144 Ave, and Hermitage Road whether during rush hour to late at night, there is no reason those two roads should have ever been designed as four lane roads to begin with. There is never enough volume to justify the capacity so the wide open roads just encourage drivers to disobey speed limits, especially school/playground zone limits. So in theory, the roads should be safe enough to ride bicycles on because of the low volume, but the few people who treat the roads as expressway alternatives to the proper arterials make it scary.
 
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And collector roads that are wide enough to accomodate street parking/have a curb lane but only have one central dividing line (technically two lanes going each direction). Much too wide, encourages speeding, and people treat is as if it's a single lane and swerve all over.
 
If there's no dashed white line, it's one lane in that direction. So Hermitage Road is technically a really wide single lane in each direction. There was someone speeding up that parking lane the other day and abruptly moved into the driving lane because there were parked cars. The Towards 40 project will help.
 
If there's no dashed white line, it's one lane in that direction. So Hermitage Road is technically a really wide single lane in each direction. There was someone speeding up that parking lane the other day and abruptly moved into the driving lane because there were parked cars. The Towards 40 project will help.
I recall being taught in driver's school to treat it as two lanes - a curb and travel lane, to stay closer to the centre line divider if in the travel lane, and make right turns from the curb lane/left turns from the travel lane.

I think you and I are referring to the same thing with your latter point. In my neighborhood it can be a literal free for all with 5 different vehicles all taking a different road position on one stretch of road. Or someone straddling the parking lane and travel lane around a curve, usually while speeding. Curb extensions definitely would help in many of these cases.
 

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