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Weather or not

^^^^ Pretty much the same across Canada -- it is a northern country.
Absolutely--kind of what makes me want to move somewhere more.... southern.
 
Absolutely--kind of what makes me want to move somewhere more.... southern.
Be my guest. My ideal life would have me buying a condo in Stockholm and one in the Tierra del Fuego and spend winter in both, so I never get more than 8 hours of sunlight a day.
 
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Edmonton and Toronto tied for first place with very similar weatherliness (dibs on the coined word), Vancouver comes next followed by Ottawa and then poor weather-besotted Winnipeg.
 

Alerts for: City of Edmonton - St. Albert - Sherwood Park​



Statements​


6:25 AM MST Sunday 14 November 2021
Special weather statement in effect for:

  • City of Edmonton - St. Albert - Sherwood Park

Wintery weather for central Alberta Sunday through Tuesday.

Off and on periods of snow, rain and freezing rain are in store for many areas of central and eastern Alberta over the next 24 hours. Snow will begin in earnest Monday morning for areas along the foothills and by the afternoon for central areas, including the Edmonton Metro.

5-10 cm is expected for areas near Nordegg and Rocky Mountain House by Monday evening while 2-5 cm can be expected for areas near and southwest of Edmonton. An additional 5-10 cm is likely overnight Monday night from the B.C. border near Hinton and Grande Prairie southeast through Edmonton and into Saskatchewan for a total of 10-15 cm by Tuesday morning.

On Tuesday, winds will increase from the northwest and blowing or drifting snow is likely before the winds weaken Tuesday evening.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ABstorm@ec.gc.ca or tweet reports using #ABStorm.
 

Alerts for: City of Edmonton - St. Albert - Sherwood Park​



Warnings​


3:45 PM MST Sunday 14 November 2021
Snowfall warning in effect for:

  • City of Edmonton - St. Albert - Sherwood Park

Heavy snowfall for parts of Alberta Monday through Tuesday. Total snowfall amounts between 10 and 20 cm are expected.

Snow will begin in western Alberta on Monday morning and spread eastward through the day, reaching regions in Central Alberta by the early afternoon.

Jasper will see 10-15 cm of snow through the day on Monday, with an additional 2-4 cm expected overnight into Tuesday.

Other regions of west central Alberta will see 5-10 cm of snow through the day on Monday, with an additional 10 cm expected overnight into Tuesday.

Regions near Edmonton and north will see 2-4 cm of snow through the day on Monday, with an additional 10-15 cm expected overnight into Tuesday.

Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions. Rapidly accumulating snow could make travel difficult over some locations. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow. Take frequent breaks and avoid strain when clearing snow.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ABstorm@ec.gc.ca or tweet reports using #ABStorm.
 
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Looks like God doesn't like Mexico -- Edmonton dead last for the first time since this thread began. And to put a fine point on it, Vancouver came in first place (the rain stopped!) Second goes to Ottawa followed by Toronto and Winnipeg (stopped snowing).
 
It's near snow day here!
 
A colleague from work just had to be evacuated from his house in Abbotsford because of this. Things are INSANE out there...
And people have the courage to deny climate change --'
 
it would be interesting to correlate the mudslide and flooding areas with forest fire areas over the last couple of years.

my guess is that in many cases it's not just the amount of rainfall, it's that without the tree canopy and ground cover there is no retention left and the entire rainfall amount immediately becomes unimpeded runoff.
 
it would be interesting to correlate the mudslide and flooding areas with forest fire areas over the last couple of years.

my guess is that in many cases it's not just the amount of rainfall, it's that without the tree canopy and ground cover there is no retention left and the entire rainfall amount immediately becomes unimpeded runoff.
Not sure if there are studies for Canada/North America, but there are studies on de-forestation and mudslides in South America and they corroborate your thoughts.
 

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