News   Apr 03, 2020
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Parking, Parking, Parking

Perhaps what is really happening is it will be returned to the status quo in the short term, then be redesigned for something more permanent and visually nice, in the long term, now that accelerated Bike Plan implementation is being funded.
 
Perhaps what is really happening is it will be returned to the status quo in the short term, then be redesigned for something more permanent and visually nice, in the long term, now that accelerated Bike Plan implementation is being funded.

A key missing piece is the 109 to 116 street section that would feed into and flow out of this. Right now it's non existent and many people on bikes don't feel comfortable riding on the road here evidenced by the higher number of bikes you see riding on the sidewalk along this stretch.
And then as was mentioned, the 121 street unprotected bike lane on the other end of the Promenade needs to be upgraded.

This pilot on Victoria Promenade really illustrates why building out a bike network in piecemeal fashion will have Underperforming results and why the city committing towards a full network by 2030 (so another $100 million in the next budget cycle) will yield much better results in both design and utilization - or at least it should.
 
There are 713,000 registered vehicles in Edmonton and population forecasts say we could double in size in 30 years and so we're potentially doubling cars on the road if our current patterns continue.

When it comes to parking downtown, if we're going to have a sufficient amount, do people think current parking lots should remain undeveloped because we're not going to have enough of it?

And our roads - and specifically access into the core - how is that going to be facilitated with increasing vehicle traffic but no new road infrastructure? Is there space in the core to widen roads for this increase in traffic? How are we going to avoid future congestion?

These are questions that were posed to cities, in part by the car industry, as they advocated for expanded roads and more parking since the 50s.
And as pointed out in the video below, the car industry has pretty much always gotten what it has wanted - such that neighbourhoods (usually of lower income) were wiped out and buildings bulldozed for more and more parking and freeways etc. And yet congestion and parking problems continue to be an issue.

Back in the 70s it was noted that for every one mile of new road, two miles of existing road needed to be repaired/redone - a huge cost. Its an issue getting worse.

Anyone with an answer specifically about parking needs downtown as our population begins to multiply in this city? What's going to happen if we develop more of this land currently allocated for parking for people to live and for businesses to locate? And how are people going to get downtown in a reasonable amount of time if driving with increasing traffic?

 
Vehicles will be very much a part of getting to and from our Downtown for some time into the future, however we are severely under parked and a lot of surface parking lots and parkades are empty most of the time. There won't be any need to development more parking in the foreseeable future.
 
Vehicles will be very much a part of getting to and from our Downtown for some time into the future, however we are severely under parked and a lot of surface parking lots and parkades are empty most of the time. There won't be any need to development more parking in the foreseeable future.
And continue to develop those underused parking lots when we can so there are fewer and fewer despite doubling in population size in only 30 years from now?
 
When current parking lots get developed they most often build a parkade either for residents or workers/visitors. I think we have a long ways to go before we have to worry about there not being enough parking. For the most part parking rates are quite reasonable right now.
 
Edmonton could be a world leader in this.


"French parking lots could soon generate as much electricity as 10 nuclear power plants, after a law is expected to win final passage on Tuesday requiring canopies of solar panels to be built atop all substantial lots in the country."

Screenshot_20230221-084016_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
I keep wondering what would happen if places like Southgate mall and it's Parking lot and Kingsway and it's Parking lot, and WEM and it's Parking lot could have solar panels on all the wasted space, how much power could be generated on just those three properties?
There would be a lot, When I flew out of YEG and YYC last week I looked down at large roof tops that if they had panels would probably generate enough power to run a good portion of some cities.
 
EPark changes starting May 1 to respond to current parking demand​

April 12, 2022

The City of Edmonton is updating the EPark program to respond to current parking demands and the needs of our growing city. The changes include new operating hours at all curbside EPark zones, hourly rate increases where demand is high and maintaining low rates or removing paid parking where demand is low. These changes are consistent with other Canadian cities that have adjusted pricing in response to parking demand.

Starting May 1, 2023:
  • The operating hours for all EPark zones will be 8am to 9pm Monday through Saturday and 10am to 5pm Sunday to align with local business hours, increase turnover and ensure parking space is available.
  • Free curbside parking will be adjusted from 30 to 15 minutes to support businesses and customers for pickup and dropoff activities.
  • Hourly parking rates will increase from $3.50 to $4.50 in high demand on-street parking areas (which applies to four per cent of EPark stalls in Edmonton), in three locations in the downtown area: Rice Howard Way, 103 Street between 102 Ave and 103 Ave, and 104 Street between Jasper Ave and 104 Ave.
  • Monthly parking rates will increase from $315 to $350 at all City-owned parkades to be in line with other indoor parking rates downtown.
  • The City will remove 68 EPark zones that are experiencing low demand and convert them to two or three hour time restricted zones.
  • New “parking for electric vehicle charging only” signs will be installed at 22 public electric vehicle charging locations to ensure these stalls are being used as intended.


To allow time for the public to adjust, enforcement will be eased from May 1-15, 2023. Full enforcement of EPark curbside parking will resume on May 15, 2023.

Starting June 1, 2023, thirteen new EPark zones will be added to help increase turnover and free up available stalls. The locations will include:​
  • Three zones in the 124 Street Business Improvement Area,
  • Five zones in the Old Strathcona Business Improvement Area,
  • Two zones in the Kingsway Business Improvement Area, and
  • Three zones in the Downtown Business Improvement Area.


For more information visit edmonton.ca/EPark.​

For more information:
edmonton.ca/EPark

Media contact:
Derek Logan
Communications Advisor
Communications and Engagement​
 
Is this our first taste of variable pricing? Pleased to see the city making use of the new (ish) technology to tailor offerings at a very granular level.
 

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