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New Zoning Bylaw

Edmonton is really interesting because we’ve managed to do a bunch of controversial things without much fanfare while Calgary and its mayor seem to be getting hammered over the same things. One example is was we passed a climate emergency declaration before them with little coverage and in Calgary it’s still an extremely contentious issue that may end up sinking the mayor.

The Zoning Bylaw renewals are another example of Edmonton quietly getting stuff done whereas Calgary seemingly is stuck fighting over politics. We’re on an Edmonton specific forum, but IMO we’re the city to watch closely because there’s a lot being done.
 
Unlike Calgary, there doesn't appear to be a lot of infighting in Edmonton City Council. Our council just has Karen Principe and Jennifer Rice as the only naysayers, and I doubt Rice will last any longer.
 
Edmonton is really interesting because we’ve managed to do a bunch of controversial things without much fanfare while Calgary and its mayor seem to be getting hammered over the same things. One example is was we passed a climate emergency declaration before them with little coverage and in Calgary it’s still an extremely contentious issue that may end up sinking the mayor.

The Zoning Bylaw renewals are another example of Edmonton quietly getting stuff done whereas Calgary seemingly is stuck fighting over politics. We’re on an Edmonton specific forum, but IMO we’re the city to watch closely because there’s a lot being done.
It's a genuine odd quirk that I'm noticing between the two cities. It's only a matter of time until density advocates in Calgary point to us as a model, but even then I'm not too sure how successful they'll be in the face of increasing opposition.

I keep noting that for all the faults this council has, the fact that this zoning bylaw got passed with relatively little issue will be one of its strongest legacies. Something that every other city in this country seems to struggle with for some god damn reason.

It must be frustrating for someone in the "nicer" cities to see Edmonton do this work, while people still continue to snub us lol
 
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Appreciation post that Edmonton passed its ZBR last year and that new housing forms are being built across the city.
 
Housing form is diversifying, but apartments still form the bulk of infill and most new housing is still built in the suburbs.
 
It's a genuine odd quirk that I'm noticing between the two cities. It's only a matter of time until density advocates in Calgary point to us as a model, but even then I'm not too sure how successful they'll be in the face of increasing opposition.

I keep noting that for all the faults this council has, the fact that this zoning bylaw got passed with relatively little issue will be one of its strongest legacies. Something that every other city in this country seems to struggle with for some god damn reason.

It must be frustrating for someone in the "nicer" cities to see Edmonton do this work, while people still continue to snub us lol
The opposition is related to the level of demand and fear related to that by existing home owners elsewhere and here it is more moderate. However, this will help keep Edmonton more affordable.

Some of those from some of those "nicer" cities further away may get to come here regularly to visit their grandchildren, because their kids can afford to live closer. It will be an unintended consequence of the nimby-ism there.
 
Housing form is diversifying, but apartments still form the bulk of infill and most new housing is still built in the suburbs.

I would love some form of soft green belt for Edmonton to reduce sprawl, but given the provinces recent meddling in municipal affairs, I don't think that would ever be supported. I think making infill as easy as possible is as much as we can hope for at this time, and the city has done a great job of that.

My main worry now is that with the new powers the province is giving themselves they will start rescinding parts of the zoning bylaw, such as allowing multiple units in single family areas, or local commercial. After all, our premier clearly looks up to multiple people who believe the 15 minute city conspiracy, so i wouldn't be surprised if she believes it herself.
 
I would love some form of soft green belt for Edmonton to reduce sprawl, but given the provinces recent meddling in municipal affairs, I don't think that would ever be supported. I think making infill as easy as possible is as much as we can hope for at this time, and the city has done a great job of that.

My main worry now is that with the new powers the province is giving themselves they will start rescinding parts of the zoning bylaw, such as allowing multiple units in single family areas, or local commercial. After all, our premier clearly looks up to multiple people who believe the 15 minute city conspiracy, so i wouldn't be surprised if she believes it herself.
I would support some form of greenbelt or environmental protection restricting greenfield development as the best agricultural lands we have are immediately surrounding Edmonton. With climate change looming and making some areas worse for farming we should support protecting what farmland we have to help secure a sustainable food supply.

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I would support some form of greenbelt or environmental protection restricting greenfield development as the best agricultural lands we have are immediately surrounding Edmonton. With climate change looming and making some areas worse for farming we should support protecting what farmland we have to help secure a sustainable food supply.

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Great map, I was told by a Farmer friend of mine who was a soils specialist that Alberta used to have a small amount of Class 1 soil but it is now completely buried under Edmonton and Calgary. Sad really.
 
The Globe had an interesting piece about zoning and housing in Canada and Edmonton comes out looking pretty good: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-housing-density-multiplexes-cities/

Edmonton has led the way on multiplex zoning, which it has done in phases over the past five years. In 2024, the city enacted a new zoning designation that allows up to eight units across a wide swath of the city.

In the first three months under the new policy, the city received 24 applications for multiple-unit housing projects in these areas, totalling 180 units, said spokesperson Karen Burgess. All were for row houses, often with accessory units behind them; none were for apartment buildings.
 
Its only the conspiracy theorists, who in their limited imaginations, will be prevented from going to other districts.

For the most part, I already spend much of my time in my own area. Maybe some people enjoy traffic and going all the way across the city, but I prefer if I can access more goods and services as close by as possible.

This is just good sense.
 

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