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LRT Safety

northlands

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When I think of how certain LRT stations are setup, how would turnstiles really work? Especially around the elevators?
 

ChazYEG

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When I think of how certain LRT stations are setup, how would turnstiles really work? Especially around the elevators?
Make the elevators activated by Arc cards and voilà.
Other than this, you'd put the barriers (and turnstiles are not the best, IMO, we should get the full height ones, to avoid the whole jumping over thing) wherever you can.
 

The_Cat

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I think Edmonton has to get past this mentality of offending the "vulnerable people". Yes, many of these people need help, but they also need supervision if they want to recover.

Also, there are at least three or four subclasses of homeless. There are working poor on the streets because they cannot afford housing. There are people on AISH who get exploited on the streets. These people need affordable housing and would gladly take it. A third class is our youth who would benefit from YESS or other shelters.

Those with addictions need treatment and other help before getting affordable housing. Finally, there is a dangerous class that are career criminals.
 
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occidentalcapital

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Well-said.

I would also point out that all evidence indicates the "vulnerable population" is actually the general public. The normal working person taking the train home from their job who gets verbally and then physically assauted and has their leg broken on the tracks. That is who is really vulnerable on the system or so it would seem... the others might be facing societal misfortune but violence is never the answer.
 

ChazYEG

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Again, as much as this is a symptom of much larger socio-economic and healthcare issues, we cannot let this things keep happening.
When you have Cancer, you don't just do chemo (long term, difficult and sometimes not effective at the beginning), but you also treat symptoms so that the patient can have quality of life until he's cured.

This is not so different. We can tackle the underlying poverty, mental health, addiction and houselesness issues broadly, with socially sensitive tools, but we also need to establish that, regardless of the reason, a lot of these people are committing crimes against other citizens and the latter also need protection and care.

We need more police presence in the streets (beat cops, especially Downtown), we also need an actual Transit Police, pay barriers in the LRT stations (as many of them as possible), we could do with the return of the loitering bylaw.
 

CaptainBL

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I truly believe and would be willing to bet that there are more attacks on a daily basis than what you see in the news. What you see reported in the news are only attacks that are actually making headlines but if you filter through Twitter you can see everyday transit users that have documented attacks or issues.

I also drove by the Royal Alex on Sunday around 1pm and saw 8 police cruisers at the transit station with yellow tape wrapped around the station but did not see anything on that one on the news.

The issue is dire, regardless of what Transit management folks would like you to believe.
 

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