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Edmonton International Airport (EIA/YEG)

My take is that they have come to realize if they want YEG and other western based pax to be somewhat loyal to them there has to be a certain level of offering available to them beyond the basics and everything else going through YYC. If they offer for example flights from YEG to a few of the DL hubs the flights have a good chance of success without stealing from what they need flowing through YYC. With people in YEG, YLW, YXE often utilizing WS they will then be ok with and select them to fly through YYC over to Europe or to fairly unique destinations (from a western Canadian perspective) such as Austin or Washington, DC for example. The second fact of the matter is they don't have much of a choice under the current strategy of drawing down the east while maintaining (or even increasing) the number of frames in their fleet they figured those should be spread out and as other western stations grow YYC can grow accordingly.
Well, I suppose they can't fly all those extra planes from the east out of places like Grande Prairie and Prince George so they had to either get rid of them or put them on an under served larger market in the west. So in that regard it is a very logical decision.

Perhaps this may establish more loyalty to West Jet in Edmonton. Will someone who flies West Jet from Edmonton to Minneapolis now be more willing to fly them to Europe? I don't know. Maybe the most surprising thing is they have finally realized they can't try funnel everything through Calgary and it is not the centre of the Universe, after all these years since the 1990's.

I doubt they will add international flights from Edmonton soon, although it really irks many of us that we often have to fly south and then fly back over our city to go to Europe, but perhaps they are becoming a more mature company with better leadership now. I suppose one step at a time.
 
New trans border check in counters closer to US cus
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January Pax #s are out and would probably say met expectations. A few days with several cancellations earlier in January due to fog might have hurt things only slightly. Jan 2022 was still down big with COVID so won't be seeing the 100% growth numbers for much longer. Summer 2023 could be big though with almost all airlines growing their sched (PD & WS mainly).

January 2023​

Terminal (YOY growth %)​

  • Terminal Traffic: 493,822 passengers (114.3%)
  • Domestic 372,022 passengers (88.9%)
  • Transborder 60,532 passengers (370%)
  • International 61,268 passengers (197.1%)

Fixed Base Operators (FBO) (YOY growth %)​

  • 45,288 passengers (62.7%)

Total passengers - Terminal and FBO (YOY growth %)​

  • 539,110 passengers (108.7%)

Rolling 12 month moves above 6 million: 6,130,484
 
Presently KLM pricing YEG-AMS at over $2300 economy class for many days this summer. They must be seeing very strong bookings. Meanwhile Condor is pricing around $1400-1800 on YEG-FRA over the summer.
 
Presently KLM pricing YEG-AMS at over $2300 economy class for many days this summer. They must be seeing very strong bookings. Meanwhile Condor is pricing around $1400-1800 on YEG-FRA over the summer.

I know. I wanted to book October on KLM and it's $1,400+ still. Will wait for better deal or look for alternative.
 
That's ridiculous pricing, even for summer.

We are doing YYC-AMS (similar options for YEG a few months ago) for under $700 in March.
 
That's ridiculous pricing, even for summer.

We are doing YYC-AMS (similar options for YEG a few months ago) for under $700 in March.
Huh? We are going direct each way.
Did you mean "nonstop" or "direct" via ? "

Direct​

A direct flight is from one airport to another, but includes stops in one or more cities along the way. The flight number or aircraft and your boarding pass remain the same, however, until the final destination is reached. You may be able to stay onboard during the stop or, if local regulations call for it, made to disembark with all your carry-on luggage, only to re-board again, re-stow your luggage, and re-take your assigned seat.

Non-stop​

A non-stop flight is from one airport to another, without any stops along the way. When airlines began adding faster, longer flying jet aircraft to their fleets in the late 1950s, the term “non-stop” became vogue. A Northwest jet could now fly you from New York to Seattle without needing to stop, and ads in newspapers turned the focus to destinations beyond the coasts.

 

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