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Cycling and Active Transportation in Edmonton

This is awesome. Excited to watch these numbers for this year!
Screen Shot 2021-04-22 at 1.20.50 PM.png
 
@thommyjo When we first started exploring this, I summited a support ticket asking how to view the data by month instead of by day. This is what they said; hopefully you find it helpful too:


At this site, you can also create your own visualization to view total counts for a custom time period (e.g., a month, or a season) by clicking either tab "Visualize" and select "create Visualization" besides the tab "View Data" at the top menu or tab "Create Visualization". You can set up some filters for location and date range; please see the attached png file for your reference. You can also create your visualization by using your own tool.
Alternatively, you can also view the below tableau public dashboard. We are still working to improve its visualization for this dashboard.
https://public.tableau.com/profile/...CyclistPedestrians_15833346762900/EcoCounters

Please note that there are 2 sites that are currently not working:
  • LRT SUP East of 92 Street (need reinstallation)
  • 102 Avenue E of 105 Street (there was a construction and need reinstallation)

    Eco Counter Open Data inquiry Apr 26, 2021.PNG
 
Wouldn’t DTBN stand for Downtown Bike Network?
That makes a lot more sense haha. I think there was another chart that separated the lanes by direction, so I assumed it was the same thing. But you must be right for this one.
 
THere was a tableau site someone made for this circulating a while ago. it scraped the excel sheet the city puts out from their counters (of which they have hundreds, that map isn't showing all of them) and agregated them into a map with dots on it that correlated to the traffic. there was even a little slider to get the time period, from what day to what day to show. I can't remember enough about the name of it or who made it to refind it right now. it was the project or a single person, not a city thing.
I remember spending some time on the tableau page, as well as mucking around in the raw excel sheets. if i remember correctly, the High level did about 1700 people on the west side and 900 on the east side on a busy summer day, and the busiest lane i could find was the 83 ave lane on saturdays during the summer, at almost 3k bikes.
Sorry to be so vague, but it was a really good tool, i just can't remember how to find it right now. it was a tableau site made by some grad student or something.
 

By the numbers: Edmonton’s bike network

1,391 total kilometres.
15 kilometres of protected bike lanes.
31 kilometres of on-street painted bike lanes.
1,180 kilometres of shared pathways.

According to Paths for People, this network includes:

7.8 kilometres of cycling infrastructure Downtown

4.4 kilometres of cycling infrastructure in Strathcona/Queen Alexandra

13,724: Bike volume recorded on Edmonton’s key active transportation corridors (by the city’s EcoCounter stations) on Sunday, May16.

1,574:Bike volume recorded at the city’s busiest station, High Level Bridge west, on Sunday, May 16.
 
The bike infrastructure outrage is really hard to hear. I'm definitely on the vocal supporter side. Its just so rarely supported by facts or research or financials or traffic impact data. People are so misinformed and opinionated with no logic. Its really hard.

Honestly, I think the city's decision to paint bike lanes all over suburbia screwed a lot up. Huge waste of money, poorly researched. I lived in one of those suburbs and seeing them do it and then tear it up was a joke. Really poor leadership.

So now all the people who are jaded from that hear about bike lanes and just laugh. Meanwhile they've never read a single thing about them or know any of the global data around cities and cycling.

I'm just slowly convincing all my friends to get bikes haha. Thats converts them usually. I invite 5 people to go get brews downtown. 4 of them have bikes and I ensure one doesn't. One of us lends them a bike. They bike 102 Ave, love it, buy a bike 3 weeks later and now enjoy the bike lanes and understand their value. It ain't gunna change a city, but I've biked with a good 20+ friends DT already, so im hoping if they all speak well of bike infastructure to their friends and family it can have a ripple out.
 
The bike infrastructure outrage is really hard to hear. I'm definitely on the vocal supporter side. Its just so rarely supported by facts or research or financials or traffic impact data. People are so misinformed and opinionated with no logic. Its really hard.

Honestly, I think the city's decision to paint bike lanes all over suburbia screwed a lot up. Huge waste of money, poorly researched. I lived in one of those suburbs and seeing them do it and then tear it up was a joke. Really poor leadership.

So now all the people who are jaded from that hear about bike lanes and just laugh. Meanwhile they've never read a single thing about them or know any of the global data around cities and cycling.

I'm just slowly convincing all my friends to get bikes haha. Thats converts them usually. I invite 5 people to go get brews downtown. 4 of them have bikes and I ensure one doesn't. One of us lends them a bike. They bike 102 Ave, love it, buy a bike 3 weeks later and now enjoy the bike lanes and understand their value. It ain't gunna change a city, but I've biked with a good 20+ friends DT already, so im hoping if they all speak well of bike infastructure to their friends and family it can have a ripple out.
That's an amazing approach, good on you! I was always pro-bike lane, but even my perception on them changed once I started riding again. I didn't realize just how vulnerable biking on the roads downtown would make me feel, or how efficient bike commuting could be even in Edmonton. I wouldn't have taken the leap if it weren't for covid, and I'm one person who won't stop once we get back to a relative normal. I don't think I'm alone in this, and I truly hope that this spike in cycling (and active commuting in general) can help to shift our Overton window regarding bike lanes for the long term.
 
The bike infrastructure outrage is really hard to hear. I'm definitely on the vocal supporter side. Its just so rarely supported by facts or research or financials or traffic impact data. People are so misinformed and opinionated with no logic. Its really hard.

Honestly, I think the city's decision to paint bike lanes all over suburbia screwed a lot up. Huge waste of money, poorly researched. I lived in one of those suburbs and seeing them do it and then tear it up was a joke. Really poor leadership.

So now all the people who are jaded from that hear about bike lanes and just laugh. Meanwhile they've never read a single thing about them or know any of the global data around cities and cycling.

I'm just slowly convincing all my friends to get bikes haha. Thats converts them usually. I invite 5 people to go get brews downtown. 4 of them have bikes and I ensure one doesn't. One of us lends them a bike. They bike 102 Ave, love it, buy a bike 3 weeks later and now enjoy the bike lanes and understand their value. It ain't gunna change a city, but I've biked with a good 20+ friends DT already, so im hoping if they all speak well of bike infastructure to their friends and family it can have a ripple out.
I assume you're talking about those people who don't understand that bike lanes are used for actual commutes and actually reduce traffic despite taking room away from cars, they aren't just fun "look how environmentally friendly we are" things.
 

Interesting article that compiled various academic and business research into the economic benefits or non benefits of bike lanes on businesses in various US and Canadian big cities.

A couple of notable bits from the article (from my personal bias of course):

On whether bike lanes that take away car parking can boost retail sales:
"after bike lanes and wider sidewalks were installed, two-thirds of merchants reported that increased levels of bicycling and walking improved business, only four per cent said the changes hurt sales."

It was also concluded that people on bikes spend more money and are more likely to stop spontaneously compared to car drivers.


On how biking infrastructure can attract top talent in your city:
"Over two terms, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel poured millions into bike lanes, winning the best bike city in America title. He said "you cannot be for a startup, high-tech economy and not be pro-bike."
 
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This afternoon I ran into Michelle and Seann of Pedego Electric Bikes, luckily they're ok ! They graciously let me take a photo, well they had no choice, lol.
2021-07-25 059.JPG

They are hosting the Pedego Edmonton Bike Palooza & Bike Edmonton Event this coming Thursday at 12 noon at Café Bicyclette.
There will be ebike rentals (I plan on finally testing one of their sweet bikes), and a workshop with Bike Edmonton including guided rides on how to commute about town on an ebike at 3:30.
I sense a photo opp...
 
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I was biking in Fort Sask today, on a couple of the MTB trails they have down by the river. It's an amazing area, smaller than places like Terwillegar etc, but really well maintained. Lots of really well-designed trails, with lots of trickier elements built righ into the main trail, with an easier bypass, and a couple jump areas. The whole place really struck me as well-planned and run.
Anyways, the best thing i saw there were these signs, placed at intervals along the main bit of singletrack that connected everything together. I think this is just so cool! so many trails in Edmonton are unnamed, or if they have a name, it's something odd that not everyone uses or recognizes, and has nothing to do with the location. It's a navigation and safety issue, and i think signs like these would go a long way towards improving emergency response in the River Valley.
IMG_1326.JPG
 

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