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Car-Free Streets

Untrue, there is still movement on revising this, but because of the way bylaw motions work at Council, it has to wait at least a year before it can come back for consideration. In the meantime, there's additional studies and data being collected to strengthen the argument for closing it to vehicles again. (There were also some shenanigans from Admin that basically put a thumb on the scale, but I can't remember the details right now; Speaking Municipally talked about it on their podcast episode after the decision was made.)

Yes, data is being collected to learn more about the various transportation metrics of this area for a future report.

Let the debate continue as to whether 102 Ave should be closed to traffic! And sorry to interrupt this regularly scheduled program. 😆
 
Call Paris and then get back to me
Surely 104 st should be the preferred option for pedestrian street. Already precedent set when the market was there and it is lined with restaurants and bars.
Parisian street v this one is, I’m sorry, asinine. The whole ROW is going to be LRT, bike lane, vehicle lane and pedestrian. It’s never going to look like a 300 year old street scape! Let’s drop this thread 🙏
 
Showing old streets in Europe are kind of counterproductive, but it's not the only option that would work here, north american cities used to look much different. Look at the two photos, walkable city, public transportation, mixed use zoning, gorgeous streetfronts.

This used to be Edmonton. This worked for a long time before we ripped a lot of it out. It can work again.

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'Showing old streets in Europe are kind of counterproductive'

Not when certain lobby groups and misguided councillors are drinking the koolaid.
 
The new video from City Beautiful answers the question - Can Edmonton build Euro-style street networks within its existing wide and long downtown or other neighbourhood blocks?

Ok it doesn't say Edmonton, but it's definitely relevant to us in that we have very wide roadways and long blocks. I love the idea presented for a 120m × 120m parking lot and converting it into a residential block with narrow streets.


 
The thing is that you can find cities that are more akin to old European ones in other places in the Americas. Go walk cities like Santiago, Lima, Cartagena, Mexico City, Rio, São Paulo (and pretty much any other large city in Latin America), for example. While they have a host of other issues, they are proof that we can do better!
Yes, there are walkable, cozy, attractive districts in all of these cities. But many other areas of these same cities are sprawling, low-density, unattractive and car-oriented (indeed, choking on exhaust fumes).

This is the case for a lot of cities in Europe as well: a cozy, historic, walkable urban centre but also ghastly suburbs studded with concrete high-rises, oriented towards the automobile and poorly served by transit.
 
Surely 104 st should be the preferred option for pedestrian street. Already precedent set when the market was there and it is lined with restaurants and bars.
Parisian street v this one is, I’m sorry, asinine. The whole ROW is going to be LRT, bike lane, vehicle lane and pedestrian. It’s never going to look like a 300 year old street scape! Let’s drop this thread 🙏
There's another set of studies that's gone to Urban Planning Committee and administration for overall downtown pedestrianization. I'm not sure where it's at, but there are orgs asking for input
 
Downtown Pedestrianization

Paths for People and UDI - Edmonton Metro are working with various organizations within Edmonton's downtown to develop community-driven strategies and projects that support revitalization efforts and make streets that are friendlier places to walk and roll.

 

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What's also so nice during that video is that you can hear people talking, the music (that doesn't need to be blaring) and you can even hear birds.

Vehicle traffic mutes those lovely sounds.

I'm reading the book Happy City, which early on includes a focus on Enrique Penalosa, a former mayor of Bogota who made some significant changes to that city (his brother Gil was part of that and then ran for mayor himself in Toronto where he came second to Tory).

"And what are our needs for happiness? We need to walk, just as birds need to fly. We need to be around other people. We need beauty. We need contact with nature. And most of all we need not to be excluded. We need to feel some sort of equality." E Penalosa

He then threw out his city's ambitious highway plan (and hiked gas taxes) and instead poured his budget into hundreds of miles of bike lanes (this happened 1998-2001); a vast new chain of parks and pedestrian plazas; and a network of new libraries, schools and daycare centres.

"A city can be friendly to people or it can be friendly to cars, but it can't be both." E Penalosa.

That said, he still initiated some major road projects as needed, but there was much more balance on other priorities. Some of the heavier handed things he did included restricting how often people could commute to work per week via car. He was almost recalled early on in his term for these sweeping changes and had low approval ratings but by the end of his term he had some of the highest historical approval ratings ever.

There's a 2009 documentary called Bogota Change about how one of the world's most dangerous, violent and corrupt capitals transitioned into a model city.
 
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Build density, provide more reasons for folks to come Downtown, live Downtown, work Downtown and encourage the continued support of the storefront refurbishment program ALONG with a focus on cleanliness and safety.

They will come, but don't close stretches just to close stretches to satisfy philosophical and ideological beliefs.
 
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