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Alberta Politics

There are approximately 2.8 million eligible voters in Alberta and the UCP received 927,000 votes which is 33% of eligible voters and 52.6% of votes actually cast. The NDP received 776,000 votes which is 28% of eligible voters (16% less than the UCP) and 44% of votes actually cast. On a pure percentage of the vote basis, 52.6% would result in 46 seats and 44% would result in 38 (with the other 3.4% given to "others" in the form of 3 seats) which is not that far off the actual results of 49 UCP and 38 NDP.

At a 61% overall turnout, it's also not a "pretty bad turnout". It's nowhere near Singapore's typical mid-90% but it's quite a bit better than Luxembourg. It's on a par with Canada nationally and with US presidential elections https://www.pewresearch.org/short-r...es-still-trails-that-of-many-other-countries/
It's harder to find comparable provincial or state statistics than national ones.

The interesting thing for me is whether the NDP can continue to consolidate "the centre" and not embrace the far left the way the UCP has embraced the far right. I thought they ran a reasonably competent campaign with one exception - they had a strong economic platform (even with their nominal hike to business taxes) and I don't think they were nearly strong enough in presenting it. It was as if they simply ceded that ground to the UCP (ground that the UCP certainly didn't earn or deserve) rather than aggressively present their own plan...
I agree 100% with your comments. The turn out was actually fairly good, compared to past history, a bit down from the last provincial election, but that was the highest in decades. It is interesting the popular vote percentages were not too far off from the number of seats.

I also don't know why the NDP didn't defend itself more against attacks from the UCP on their economic platform, which it actually could have easily done. They already won the votes of people most concerned about health care and education, it was people concerned about the economy that either reluctantly stuck with the UCP or didn't support the NDP.
 
I suspect in the end, the Alberta NDP’s ties to the Federal NDP (and thus Trudeau as he’s propped up by their coalition) sank their ship imo. Seemed like the no 1 argument I heard from those who are small c voters who were not impressed by the UCP and even more disliked Smith, but still couldn’t bring themselves to vote NDP.

Which is sad, because the ANDP and federal NDP are two very different parties politically that I don’t believe align on much, nor do I really think an ANDP gov’t would really have any influence from the federal party. Notley in the past wasn’t afraid to push back against them.

But alas, she never really addressed that point (to my knowledge), which I think just reinforced those beliefs for a lot of folks. The dislike for Trudeau runs extremely deep in this province.
I think this was an issue particularly in rural Alberta, but really how much can you distance yourself from a Federal party with the exact same name, in some peoples minds?

Of course its even harder for the provincial Liberals now, so we are apparently left with only one major party name that a number of people in Alberta will find acceptable.

I would say this is not fair, but of course in some other parts of Canada the word conservative is a bit toxic too. For instance, look at how well the BC Conservatives have done provincially.
 
I wonder if part of the lower turnout was partly because of some UCP voters staying home. Also, the NDP took the high road in the face of many ad hominem attacks.
 
I also don't know why the NDP didn't defend itself more against attacks from the UCP on their economic platform, which it actually could have easily done. They already won the votes of people most concerned about health care and education, it was people concerned about the economy that either reluctantly stuck with the UCP or didn't support the NDP.
That defense involves data and facts. People who voted UPC in this election don't traffic in such witchcraft.
 
It’s sad that the UCP doesn’t show more interest in Edmonton.

Well, because Edmonton wasn’t really a Battleground in Alberta Election 🗳 2023 like Calgary was mainly the focus for both the UCP & NDP.

In plus with Alberta NDP winning all City of Edmonton provincial ridings yesterday, there will be 0 UCP cabinet minister from this city .

Alberta Premier elect Danielle Smith will likely have to pick either Dale Nally MLA- Morinville-St. Albert , Nate Glubish MLA -Strathcona-Sherwood Park, Searle Turton -MLA Spruce Grove-Stony Plain or Jackie Armstrong-Homeniuk MLA - Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville, which all 4 of them won re election yesterday to represent city of Edmonton in the UCP government for next 4 years. As those 4 UCP MLA’s ridings are the closest to Edmonton.
 
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The NDP gained an average of five percentage points (over 2019, Alberta Party/NDP) in popular vote in Calgary. They also made gains in Red Deer and Metro ridings in Edmonton and Calgary.
 
Well, because Edmonton wasn’t really a Battleground in Alberta Election 🗳 2023 like Calgary was mainly the focus for both the UCP & NDP.

In plus with Alberta NDP winning all City of Edmonton provincial ridings yesterday, there will be 0 UCP cabinet minister from this city .

Alberta Premier elect Danielle Smith will likely have to pick either Dale Nally MLA- Morinville-St. Albert , Nate Glubish MLA -Strathcona-Sherwood Park, Searle Turton -MLA Spruce Grove-Stony Plain or Jackie Armstrong-Homeniuk MLA - Fort Saskatchewan-Vegreville, which all 4 of them won re election yesterday to represent city of Edmonton in the UCP government for next 4 years. As those 4 UCP MLA’s ridings are the closest to Edmonton.
She doesn't have to at all. There are 20 MLAs in Edmonton that she can choose from for cabinet positions (or not an MLA at all). And this highlights the absurdity and immaturity of our politicians. There will be no cabinet representation from our capitol city because these people are petty children.
 
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^ And I guess this is how Smith is going to do it and that way she can include some more ucp viewpoints into the mix (not to mention the payroll) because clearly that's what Edmontonians want and need. 🙄

But maybe she deserves some credit here for at least including Edmonton and we'll see how this goes?

 
^ And I guess this is how Smith is going to do it and that way she can include some more ucp viewpoints into the mix (not to mention the payroll) because clearly that's what Edmontonians want and need. 🙄

But maybe she deserves some credit here for at least including Edmonton and we'll see how this goes?

This quote, to me, sums up Smith's thinking on Edmonton (maybe even a bit of Calgary):

"We've got a lot of support that we need to get to the City of Edmonton in dealing with their public disorder and mental health and addictions crisis." (emphasis added)

Yes there's a lot to do, but the city is also so much more than that.
 
This quote, to me, sums up Smith's thinking on Edmonton (maybe even a bit of Calgary):

"We've got a lot of support that we need to get to the City of Edmonton in dealing with their public disorder and mental health and addictions crisis." (emphasis added)

Yes there's a lot to do, but the city is also so much more than that.
But this is how the story of a new Alberta begins.

They will start cleansing the city streets of those with addiction issues under the guise of "compassionate intervention" and begin filling for-profit detention centres with marginalized people. Then, it will be anyone who is un-housed. Then others with mental health issues. All with a police force that has no federal oversight in a jurisdiction that believes they don't have to follow federal laws.

I'm not saying that this is definitely what will happen, but the way the board is set up you can see how easy it would be to go in a very bad direction.
 
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