Valley Line LRT | ?m | ?s | City of Edmonton

Airboy

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thommyjo

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I just don't get the timeliness on these when all over the world we see bigger projects done faster. Yes there are others with delays and long time frames, but there's also stuff like Hudson yards that was built in 3 years. One of the largest projects in NA this decade. In one of the most challenging cities to build in.

Why can we not train and hire more workers? Why are we always multiple years late? Why do we settle for this?

Everyone has struggled with the pandemic. Lots of companies have still got stuff done though. Makes me think trans ed either isn't motivated enough, or it's leaders aren't that great.

Are they even working overtime? In private companies people grind to meet deadlines. My friends at the city (eng department) still take every second Friday off, even if they're behind on projects they say...
 

Edmonchuk

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I just don't get the timeliness on these when all over the world we see bigger projects done faster.

Well, lets see what's going on with bigger projects in Canada:

LRT line in Eglinton pushed by 2+ years. Construction started in 2011!

LRT in Ottawa delayed by 15 months

LRT in Waterloo/Kitchener delayed by 2 years?

And what about the over the world:

LRT delayed in Tel Aviv by 3 years and over budget

Anyway, don't wanna waste my time. Delays are no good but omg stop this silly whining.
 

The_Cat

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With President Biden’s move to ease supply chain bottlenecks, I wonder if Canada (and maybe Mexico) will follow suit. Given the nations are part of USMCA (formerly NAFTA), could all the ports work together?
 
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westcoastjos

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"Given the small profit margin of many construction contracts, a significant number of contractors may not be able to withstand the financial impact of COVID-19.

Contractors are experiencing increased costs for a variety of reasons. For example, there is a need for more thorough and frequent cleaning of offices and job sites, a greater supply of hand-washing facilities, and additional staffing requirements to learn new safety guidelines and to perform temperature checks, and other activities required or recommended to maintain a healthy work environment.1 Contractors are experiencing diminished labor productivity caused by a number of factors, including increased employee absenteeism triggered by illness, quarantine, issues with public transportation, lack of available childcare; the general effects of telecommuting; and the necessity of reduced on-site staffing or additional shift work mandated by new federal or local social distancing requirements. Materials may be more expensive to timely procure as a result of global manufacturing shutdowns (e.g., goods made in China), closure of ports, and general material transportation delays within the United States. Even if a bonded principal is weathering the storm, a bonded project may still suffer because lower-tier subcontractors and suppliers are simultaneously facing the same issues.

While operating costs are increasing, revenue streams are declining. Government or owner-imposed shutdowns have suspended some private and public construction work, curtailing anticipated progress payments needed to fund overall operations. While other projects are continuing, some nervous or financially-distressed upstream owners/general contractors are slowing down payment processing or declaring bankruptcy, affecting the contractor’s ability to adequately staff its own operations and pay lower-tier vendors. In addition to increased operating costs and payment delays, contractors may be subjected to delay damage claims from obligees when projects cannot be completed on schedule. The first place for principals and their sureties to look for some relief is in the underlying construction contract."

American Bar Association

"The full breadth and scope of the changes needed to address issues arising from the pandemic are still unknown, and this analysis is likely to continue to evolve until a vaccine or other curative measures are in place on a global basis.

These new realities touch almost every aspect of the construction process, and specifically such issues as: contract or project notices for default, scheduling and adjustments; project suspension, termination and reinstatement; Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and workplace safety compliance; work force management; material, subcontractor and supply chain delays and impacts; risk management and insurance; claims avoidance or, alternatively, claims management; and the disputes process."

HKLaw

You can definitely hire and train more workers, however, that takes time. You offer someone a job, they give notice at their previous employer, which is typically two weeks. Onboarding is another week or two and then training, depending on the complexity of the job they have been hired to do can vary. Some specialized trades don't have an endless pool of talent. If those people are all employed or working on other projects, the education pipeline to hire more people in that sector is years, not months or weeks.

The pandemic has impacted every part of the business, not just one. When you develop a risk register, you typically plan for a few things to go sideways at any given time, not everything at once. Past project delays aren't a good indicator or comparison of this project, because past projects didn't have to deal with a pandemic that impacted every single part of the project. Generally speaking, Edmonton doesn't do too bad as far as on time delivery of project goes. That said, people never focus on the good, only the bad, so a narrative develops that Edmonton is always behind schedule on projects, which isn't really the case.

Transed has indicated that employees are working overtime on this project in the past.
 

realkevbo

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Well, lets see what's going on with bigger projects in Canada:

LRT line in Eglinton pushed by 2+ years. Construction started in 2011!

LRT in Ottawa delayed by 15 months

LRT in Waterloo/Kitchener delayed by 2 years?

And what about the over the world:

LRT delayed in Tel Aviv by 3 years and over budget

Anyway, don't wanna waste my time. Delays are no good but omg stop this silly whining.
An update on the Ottawa LRT, perhaps they could have spent more time testing. I hope we do.

 

David A

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Well, lets see what's going on with bigger projects in Canada:

LRT line in Eglinton pushed by 2+ years. Construction started in 2011!

LRT in Ottawa delayed by 15 months

LRT in Waterloo/Kitchener delayed by 2 years?

And what about the over the world:

LRT delayed in Tel Aviv by 3 years and over budget

Anyway, don't wanna waste my time. Delays are no good but omg stop this silly whining.
Ok, so we have company. Well, there are some people who smoke heavily and drink to excess, but that doesn't make it a better idea because other do it too.

There is not strength in numbers when it comes to repeatedly missing deadlines either.
 

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