Holyrood Gardens Redevelopment | 86m | 25s | Regency Developments | DER + Associates

What do you think of this project?


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Vacs

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Well if I go by the comments of one of the scaffolders that worked on the project, it has more to do with the owner cheaping out and taking as long as it takes, and then some.
I'm skeptical of that comment from the scaffolder. Extending the construction length of a building is more expensive for an owner in many ways beyond just construction itself
 

_urbanite

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Didn't wanna post a photo because there's others who have more 'ownership' of posting for this project (and have better cameras for it lol), but the tarps on the East side of the building are coming off. about /12 the tower was exposed on that side as of Saturday evening.

Did the exposed part you saw make you cry?
 

Edmcowboy11

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I'm skeptical of that comment from the scaffolder. Extending the construction length of a building is more expensive for an owner in many ways beyond just construction itself
I get ya, basically though the statement made sense. If the owner had a choice of getting a bunch of scaffolders and get it all down in a week's time, or hire only a couple scaffolders and get it down much slower and possibly save a few bucks, the owner would prefer option 2.

Also the owner is in no rush, considering he had stated he may freeze further construction on this site because the city wouldn't grant him the expansion, added floors, to the first part of his project.
 

Vacs

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I get ya, basically though the statement made sense. If the owner had a choice of getting a bunch of scaffolders and get it all down in a week's time, or hire only a couple scaffolders and get it down much slower and possibly save a few bucks, the owner would prefer option 2.

Also the owner is in no rush, considering he had stated he may freeze further construction on this site because the city wouldn't grant him the expansion, added floors, to the first part of his project.
tearing scaffolding down isn't as easy as just throwing man power at it. those piece of scaffolding go through the building and down the skip hoist. parts of those floors are likely finished or close to, so care needs to be taken. The skip hoist can only take down so much equipment per trip. Also the stucco contractor needs to be working with the scaffolders to patch all the tie backs as it comes down.

from an owner perspective. the longer construction takes, their financing is typically significantly higher, once you achieve occupancy their costs go down by quiet a bit. plus they can start renting out units and gaining income. rarely is it ever advantageous or cost effective for an owner to slow down a construction schedule.
 

CplKlinger

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From yesterday

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Clearshades

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Yes, but wouldn't the stucco eventually dry and this not be a problem? So then the covering would be removed. If this is the case it sounds like the stucco work that probably should have been done 6 months ago or more is progressing slowly or not at

leaving the stucco covered on a project with so much stucco and such a long time frame makes sense as to not have UV discoloring prior to the project being complete

in a smaller project you'd leave it wide open.

also they had the tarps over winter. summer would have to replace with the green mesh which is exxtra wor

Yes, but wouldn't the stucco eventually dry and this not be a problem? So then the covering would be removed. If this is the case it sounds like the stucco work that probably should have been done 6 months ago or more is progressing slowly or not at

Yes, but wouldn't the stucco eventually dry and this not be a problem? So then the covering would be removed. If this is the case it sounds like the stucco work that probably should have been done 6 months ago or more is progressing slowly or not at all.
How do you keep the areas wit
Yes, but wouldn't the stucco eventually dry and this not be a problem? So then the covering would be removed. If this is the case it sounds like the stucco work that probably should have been done 6 months ago or more is progressing slowly or not at all.
That is one aspect, now
Yes, but wouldn't the stucco eventually dry and this not be a problem? So then the covering would be removed. If this is the case it sounds like the stucco work that probably should have been done 6 months ago or more is progressing slowly or not at all.
The hoarding serves multiple purposes.
1. Controlled environment for curing
2. A temporarily outer skin for areas that has yet to be applied with stucco otherwise insulation and drywall will get moisture unless you enjoy mold.
3. Compounds are mixed as they are applied. I'm sure you'd don't want to breath in super fine particulates do you?
4. Environmental due diligence...meaning no neighbors enjoy plaster falling onto their property...
5. I'm sure there are more reasons. .The ones I mentioned are generic knowledge for any tradesperson working within this faculty realm.
 

Clearshades

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tearing scaffolding down isn't as easy as just throwing man power at it. those piece of scaffolding go through the building and down the skip hoist. parts of those floors are likely finished or close to, so care needs to be taken. The skip hoist can only take down so much equipment per trip. Also the stucco contractor needs to be working with the scaffolders to patch all the tie backs as it comes down.

from an owner perspective. the longer construction takes, their financing is typically significantly higher, once you achieve occupancy their costs go down by quiet a bit. plus they can start renting out units and gaining income. rarely is it ever advantageous or cost effective for an owner to slow down a construction schedule.
As a journeyman scaffolder myself, it is the tarps that would be the more tedious job imo. A true pain in the arse especially in this type of configuration with no air--platform to fold. Maneuvering tarps to the dececending zone would be a pain as their scaffoldis' width are only 3 feet wide. One accidentally drop on a windy day and you could cost blindness to drivers.
As per scaffolding teardown, Skip elevator don't have to be used as roping it down could be used and just as fast- if not faster.
 

Vacs

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As a journeyman scaffolder myself, it is the tarps that would be the more tedious job imo. A true pain in the arse especially in this type of configuration with no air--platform to fold. Maneuvering tarps to the dececending zone would be a pain as their scaffoldis' width are only 3 feet wide. One accidentally drop on a windy day and you could cost blindness to drivers.
As per scaffolding teardown, Skip elevator don't have to be used as roping it down could be used and just as fast- if not faster.
Agreed with the issues with the tarps.
As for roping down. I've seen this used before but never anything higher than 8 or 9 floors. I couldn't imagine roping or passing down from floors 12-28?
 

Vacs

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How do you keep the areas wit

That is one aspect, now

The hoarding serves multiple purposes.
1. Controlled environment for curing
2. A temporarily outer skin for areas that has yet to be applied with stucco otherwise insulation and drywall will get moisture unless you enjoy mold.
3. Compounds are mixed as they are applied. I'm sure you'd don't want to breath in super fine particulates do you?
4. Environmental due diligence...meaning no neighbors enjoy plaster falling onto their property...
5. I'm sure there are more reasons. .The ones I mentioned are generic knowledge for any tradesperson working within this faculty realm.
Tarps/mesh are also extremely important while rasping foam. This gets extremely messy and needs to be contained.
 

Clearshades

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Agreed with the issues with the tarps.
As for roping down. I've seen this used before but never anything higher than 8 or 9 floors. I couldn't imagine roping or passing down from floors 12-28?

Agreed with the issues with the tarps.
As for roping down. I've seen this used before but never anything higher than 8 or 9 floors. I couldn't imagine roping or passing down from floors .

Agreed with the issues with the tarps.
As for roping down. I've seen this used before but never anything higher than 8 or 9 floors. I couldn't imagine roping or passing down from floors 12-28?
You can rope down as high as you want. The rope dont have to be one entire continuously distance.. At that height, do a transitional switch half way for it is safer. If minor wind is present, add more interval transitions....
 

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